Bruce Trail Part 15 – Creditview to Willoughby

After a break from the Bruce Trail hike, my friends resumed where we left off!  We had a friend re-join us after a long hiatus since the latewinter.  It’s too bad she joined us just as winter was returning! Starting where we ended in early October it was quite astonishing to see how significant of a change it was.  Colours were muted and we encountered snow and frost!

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After a break from the Bruce Trail hike, my friends resumed where we left off!  We had a friend re-join us after a long hiatus since the latewinter.  It’s too bad she joined us just as winter was returning!
Starting where we ended in early October it was quite astonishing to see how significant of a change it was.  Colours were muted and we encountered snow and frost!

Starting off where we left off in October on Creditview.Starting off on a fancy-looking trail.

After experiencing so much of the Bruce Trail that had been relatively unmaintained, I was pleasantly surprised to find the trail so nicely set up.  Trail borders and the boardwalk!

Leading into a premium boardwalk.One of the highlights of this hike.  Frost-covered Cheltenham Badlands.

One of the awesome highlights of this hike was having the opportunity to stop by the Cheltenham Badlands.  I’ve been fortunate to encounter a variety of badlands in my travels but this is the first one I’ve personally stepped into within Ontario.  Some light frost covered the terrain muting the rust coloured soil and as much as we all would have loved to take a mountain bike on to this rugged terrain, the delicate nature of the badlands and conserving them prohibits us from doing so.

After staying briefly in the badlands, we continued on the trail.  It was a little sad to some extent seeing all the trees bare and the ground covered by leaves.  Doesn’t help when the weather can’t decide between snowing or raining!

Fallen leaves cover the entire trail along the way.It was an astonishing and epic descent along this part of the trail.  Lots of fun!

Further into this section of the trail, we passed a rather large group of hikers sitting around and into a rather spectacular encounter.  The trail made this dramatic descent (or ascent if you were coming from the opposite direction).  There were some makeshift stairs but for safety and stability, a cable was run all the way down for people to hold on to.  The view down was definitely one of the highlights of this hike.

Looking back up the way we descended.  It is quite steep, hence the cable for holding on to.The trail then continues to descend down a very rocky section.

After the steep descent, we descend into this almost-temperate like environment with lots of green moss and foilage surrounding us.  The rain made for somewhat slippery conditions in addition to the mossy rocks so we took this section slower than normal.

Eventually we make our way through to a small residential area and I was pleasantly surprised to see Movember being promoted!

It's neat to see worthwhile causes being promoted along the trail.  Movember!Just discussion and commentary on how cool this house we passed by was.

A part of the Bruce Trail experience is hiking past a lot of homes, houses, and farms; and as a result we often find ourselves commenting on how we’d enjoy living or not living in such and such of a place.  Sometimes we find ourselves discussing the architecture or end up on tangential conversations such as urban living.  I myself find my thoughts drifting to and fro around how I might enjoy living so close to the Bruce Trail but then my mind shifts to thinking about public transportation sets in and snaps me back to reality!

During a further descent along the trail, we crossed the railroad.Descending even further...

This section of the trail definitely feels as if we took a significant descent.  It’s a little weird because I often think of Ontario as hilly and relatively flat but the surprise is always enjoyable.  After passing by the railroad tracks and tackling more steep descents, we find ourselves entering Forks of the Credit Provincial Park.

The only place with enough tree cover from the rain and wet snow.The trail in Fork of the Credit Provincial Park

After stopping for lunch briefly under some tree cover that was thick enough, we made our way further into the provincial park.  By then, we find ourselves dealing with a damp cold feeling although we were still dry, or at least most of us.  One of our friends was dealing with a rain jacket that was a little too antiquated to do much good.

One of the highlights and features of Forks of the Credit Provincial Park is the Cataract and waterfall as well as the Credit river that runs through the park.  This apparently was a part of what used to be an old power station that generated electricity.

Spotting the waterfall in Forks of the Credit Provincial Park.A closer look at the waterfall.A fork in the river!

Having hiked through this park over the summer as part of training for my trip to Japan, it never ceased to amaze me how different everything looked.  Everything seemed so bare and in some sense desolate and quiet.  No one else was around!

The final stretch of this hike was pretty hilly.Arriving at Escarpment Sideroad where we parked.  It was surprisingly busy with many other cars parked on the side.

Unfortunately, the rain on this hike made taking photographs a little challenging.  My lens kept getting water on it so you may notice some photos in the full gallery of this hike a bit blurry or foggy at times.  To make things worse, I found out that my GPS wasn’t tracking the hike properly.  Oh well, at least we completed the hike faster than anticipated!  We started at around 9:30 in the morning and finished around 2:30 in the afternoon.