Another EveryTrail Alternative

So … on and off … I’ve written about EveryTrail alternatives.  There have been good options, free options, not-so-easy options, and so on.

My sister recently graduated from University of Toronto with her computer science degree and the scene for developers is tough these days, very few jobs for a recent graduate.  While she’s job hunting, I’ve been talking with her about the challenge with embedding maps on to blogs and not being locked into a platform.

She ended up building her solution called Map-A-Trail.  You can upload your GPX file and it’ll generate an map and elevation chart that you can embed on your blog.

You’ll notice there’s a possibility of cute overload, but that’s just how she operates.  Check it out, try it out, and maybe give her some feedback — but be nice and constructive about it. 🙂

I’ll be testing it out myself more thoroughly but so far it looks like it has got potential.  Obviously, I am to be biased as an older brother but you can trust that I don’t accept using clunky apps.

Map-A-Trail example screenshot

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The Hunt for more EveryTrail Alternatives Continues

About a year ago, I had written about the trouble EveryTrail users had been experiencing and was on the hunt for an alternative.

There were plenty of Wordpress alternatives, and TripTrack is beginning to come through as a solid EveryTrail replacement — but what if you don’t run Wordpress, want to pay $5 a month for TripTrack — or what if you want to do more with your GPS tracks or logs on your own terms?

About a year ago, I had written about the trouble EveryTrail users had been experiencing and was on the hunt for an alternative.

There were plenty of WordPress alternatives, and TripTrack is beginning to come through as a solid EveryTrail replacement — but what if you don’t run WordPress, want to pay $5 a month for TripTrack — or what if you want to do more with your GPS tracks or logs on your own terms?

Here’s what I’ve come across that may be helpful to you:

GPSFly

gpsfly.org website screenshot
gpsfly.org website screenshot

gpsfly.org is a pretty straight forward website that lets you upload your GPS tracks and share or embed them elsewhere — should you wish to do so.  As much as I enjoy TripTrack‘s user interface, I find the site a little power hungry which makes gpsfly more appealing for anyone who would like their embedded map to load faster or have their page be a little more lightweight for mobile users.

Unfortunately it seems gpsfly has been left on its own to some extent.  A little out of date and a slightly basic, the map seems to run into an error or two when one attempts to interact with the map.  It is free at the moment though!

GPS Visualizer

GPS Visualizer website screenshot
GPS Visualizer website screenshot

GPS Visualizer was another great find I came across while looking for alternative ways to make use of GPS tracks or logs.  The great thing about this web-based application is its capability to leverage GPS tracks and log files in many different ways — and then output a map or a file that will allow you to share this visualized data elsewhere.  Its strengths is also its weakness.  While GPS Visualizer allows you to create files or code elsewhere, there is no way to embed your newly-created map or data elsewhere.  Instead, you need to find a way to host the file first.

custom google maps with GPX file

An example of a custom google map I created with a GPX / KML file following UrbanHikr's instructions
An example of a custom google map I created with a GPX / KML file following UrbanHikr’s instructions

The UrbanHikr has developed some excellent detailed instructions on how to use your GPX log file (often found recorded in your handheld GPS devices) and upload the file to custom Google maps or Google Earth.  There isn’t an easy way that I’ve found to embed this custom map as of yet but I figure one can at least capture a screenshot of this in the meantime and post a link to the actual custom map for interactivity.

There’s the updated round-up for now.  If you have any additions you think I should add to this or if I’ve missed anything, feel free to chime in and share the knowledge 🙂

Transitioning to an EveryTrail Alternative

Over the past month or so, I’ve found that EveryTrail’s maps — which I’ve embedded quite often in my blog posts — have appeared to be unable to load and I have had issues uploading GPS tracks.  It even appears that EveryTrail’s community is gradually leaving given that the site does not seem to be fully operational.  It’s rather sad since I had been using EveryTrail for quite some time. After searching around for a solution, I finally came across a worthwhile and brilliant solution.  Rather than uploading it on to EveryTrail, I’ll simply host the GPX file on my own site with the WordPress plugin, Google Maps GPX Viewer.  I have to express my thanks to ATLsoft for creating and providing this free version.

You’ll begin noticing that for any new blog posts, I’ll be using this GPX viewer to map out the hike.  I will eventually get around to changing the maps for other blog posts to the new GPX viewer.

Update [Oct. 4 2015]:  Karol Szklarski of TripTrack approached me to try out their embed capability out.  Now that I’ve migrated away from WordPress, I’ve begun introducing embedded maps via TripTrack.  Generally speaking, TripTrack’s embed functionality is pretty simple and straight forward, although I wouldn’t mind a way to extract embed codes in bulk rather than going to each map.  TripTrack’s done a great job presenting itself as a new alternative to EveryTrail and I look forward to and hope for the addition of features to embeds such as altitude and speed.

Update [Nov 25 2015]: TripTrack is now charging a fee of about 5 dollars a month ($50 per year) if you require uploading more than 10 trips or GPS tracks.  I’m currently looking into some additional alternatives should someone not want to or can’t afford the fee.

Update [Nov 29 2015]: Did some further research on more EveryTrail alternatives.  Read on!