Bruce Trail Part 31 – Euphrasia to Grey 12

Once we finally got the cars back in position at the destination point, we got to the trailhead and set off.  The air was cool and damp from the really rainy and wet week in the Grey County area.  The running joke was that they called it “Grey” County for a reason.

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The final day of our multi-day trek along the Bruce Trail for most of the week. After some discussion, we decided that since we were not in the condition to push forward after today, we’d just head home and rest up.  After some oatmeal breakfast, we initially tried to set out for Walter’s Falls.  Unfortunately, as soon as we parked the cars, my friend found that her blisters were really hurting so we had to scale back the distance to a very short trek.

Once we finally got the cars back in position at the destination point, we got to the trailhead and set off.  The air was cool and damp from the really rainy and wet week in the Grey County area.  The running joke was that they called it “Grey” County for a reason.

Hiking the Bruce Trail
Hiking the Bruce Trail

I don’t know why but I could sense a difference in this portion of the trail.  It felt different and perhaps it is because it was purely through farm area.  What is really quite extraordinary about the Bruce Trail is that some times you are hiking through such a small sliver of property that feels so wild and out of place.  As soon as you step out off the trail, you find yourself in an agricultural area, and urban road, or even a large suburban zone.

In this case, we were walking in between crop fields but the sliver of wooded area we were passing through was vast in contrast to what we had experienced in the past so it made it feel so much more like wilderness when we were in the woods.

Hiking the Bruce Trail
Hiking the Bruce Trail

In other sections, it was simply ridiculous.  The amount of overgrowth was just annoying and frustrating at times.  To make it worse and somewhat dangerous — some parts were covering up very rocky sections.  I highly recommend that anyone trekking through these parts bring a machete or be very careful when making your way through.  It isn’t obvious that there are some unstable rocks and the overgrowth on the trail can make the general experience quite challenging.

Of course after a section like that, we’re always happy to see a road and one with a nice view is a bonus.

Hiking the Bruce Trail
Hiking the Bruce Trail

It’s ironic that on the last day of our multi-day hike on the Bruce Trail, we would encounter some of the most beautiful areas.  I’m always experiencing joy when I step through paths with trees arching just enough to create a sense of a hallway passing through tall fields of crops on both sides.

Other stunning areas incorporated more dramatic or exposed rock from the escarpment along side the trail.  A part of me would love to spend time exploring more of these exposed areas of the escarpment but we were on a mission!

Hiking the Bruce Trail
Hiking the Bruce Trail

There were riverbeds that had very little water and we’d just be stepping on what almost seemed like a stone floor.  With the vibrant green moss, the whole area felt very serene.

To form a sort of juxtaposition to the giant mushroom we encountered yesterday, we stumbled upon thousands of mini mushrooms at the base of a tree we were passing by.  It had even spread on to the trail.  The diversity we’ve encountered has been so amazing.

Hiking the Bruce Trail
Hiking the Bruce Trail
Hiking the Bruce Trail

Sometimes you can’t help but admire the human influenced paths like the nearly-rectangular hallway in the photo above.  Did someone cut it this way?

Other times, there are more amusing moments like the two bridges that were built in parallel to one another.  One of course is meant to replace the other — which my friend is photographing in the picture below.

Hiking the Bruce Trail
Hiking the Bruce Trail
Hiking the Bruce Trail

After trekking through more wooded area, we made our way past more crop fields and to what looked like an abandoned stone building where we had parked.  This was the end of our attempt to hike the Bruce Trail for a week.  It didn’t work out the way we wanted it to but it was a lot of fun — we got to complete the Beaver Valley section — and on a personal level, I was happy to have the opportunity to get out of the city and have time to think and ponder the time away.

Before heading back to Toronto, we decided to stop by and try out the Flying Spatula Diner and ended up enjoying a great brunch there.  Highly recommend checking it out if you’re in the area!

>> View the full gallery of this hike on the Bruce Trail.

Author: Ehren Cheung

An explorer of life and data. Reluctantly philosophical. A seeker of the ultimate cookie. Another tree-friendly soul with an affinity for hiking and sketching.

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