Bruce Trail Part 3 – Glenridge to Short Hills

Finally a little warmer and sunnier, we returned to Glenridge to continue our Bruce Trail hike from where we left off.  Our hiking party grew by one!  Starting off a little earlier that day, we found ourselves passing through Brock University in the earlier section of the trail.

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Passing by Brock University early in the trail

Finally a little warmer and sunnier, we returned to Glenridge to continue our Bruce Trail hike from where we left off.  Our hiking party grew by one!  Starting off a little earlier that day, we found ourselves passing through Brock University in the earlier section of the trail.

It was interesting how the Bruce Trail took us past a part of the Brock University campus.  I think we even saw some rock climbing walls gated away.  After passing by a university student centre and some interesting architecture, we finally moved on into a forested area where we got to enjoy the beginning of a muddy journey.

Enjoying the surroundings along a trail bridge.

After some initial muddy areas, we arrived at a clearing with a small bridge.  Had a great view of the surrounding reeds and wetlands.  Spring is finally showing itself but then, so is the mud.  As we progressed, the muddier the trail got.  We didn’t even realize how bad it would get.

Pretty muddy today...

We stopped for a quick snack break after trudging through some serious mud.  Thankfully, we got a break once we got to sunnier and higher ground.

Enjoying the view while passing by a reservoir.Enjoyed lunch next to a nice waterfall and old mill.

As always, I enjoy the places we stop off for lunch.  They always have unique character or stories.  In this case, we were halfway through the section of the trail we planned to the complete when we came across Ecew Falls and the mill.  There were a couple of picnic tables nearby so this was perfect for a lunch spot.

Looking for directions?  A misplaced signs.

The trail gets more interesting.  Oddly enough, the trail weaves around some buildings just metres away from the old mill and Ecew Falls.  I wonder the handful of metres we walk on the trail are sometimes a bit arbitrary.

We crossed many muddy areas and streams, trying not to slip and fall.

I really enjoyed the latter part of the trail but we were all getting a bit weary of the mud.  In fact, we all took fewer photographs due to the amount of mud we had to trek through.  Not too much fun when your boot is about to get stuck in the mud every few steps and alas, I couldn’t find my gaiters my time.

The trail just got muddier.  Almost quicksand-like.

We eventually got to a point in the trail where the conditions were extremely muddy.  Almost like wading through a shallow swamp in some places.  Eventually we discovered signs indicating that over a hundred soldiers had apparently marched through the trail churning up the mud.  I’m surprised that they were allowed to hold such an event.  The trail must’ve widened significantly due to all that foot traffic.

Escaping the muddiness, we find ourselves walking down a gravel path.Always interesting to hike past the power lines.

Eventually once we made it past the muddiest section of the trail, we enjoyed a section of gravel path as a break from the mud and made our way to a field.  I’m pretty sure I’ve been here before during the autumn time quite a few years ago.

A pretty muddy part of the trail.  I slipped on the way down.

After enjoying the view of the field and power lines, we descended down this muddy hill.  While attempting to side step some serious mud, I slid on to my side.  Fortunately I didn’t get mud all over myself thanks to my backpack.

Our last stop -- Swayze Falls.  Too bad we weren't able to reach the bottom of the falls.

Finally after trudging through the mud madness.  We finally arrived at our destination, Swazye Falls.  It was a bit of a disappointment because the surroundings were too muddy to safely get closer to the waterfalls, but it was still a beautiful sight.  A little bit of reward after taking a few dunks in the mud.  In fact, only one of us managed to avoid falling.

Can’t wait for the next section of the Bruce Trail — hopefully with less mud! For now, you can view the full gallery for Glendridge to Short Hills.

http://triptrack.org/3507/embed

Author: Ehren Cheung

An explorer of life and data. Reluctantly philosophical. A seeker of the ultimate cookie. Another tree-friendly soul with an affinity for hiking and sketching.

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